Infants & Toddlers

Every child should have a positive experience at the dentist and the best oral health possible. Toddlers and preschoolers are amazing patients with personalities ranging from cautious and shy to gregarious and curious. Our goal is to make their first visit fun and informative in every way. Our caring and knowledgeable staff uses a kid-centered approach to ensure your child’s first visit is a win!

infants-and-toddlers
free-under-3-1

Under 3? Their First Visit is FREE!

Every child should achieve a healthy and beautiful smile. We are proud to offer a free 1st visit to get them started off right!

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends every child visit the dentist by the age of 1

A thorough and quick examination allows for early detection and prevention of dental problems and supports good home care habits. Our complimentary consultation to all children under the age of three is the perfect opportunity to get your child comfortable with visits to Dr. Steve and Dr. Stephanie. We are always available to answer your questions or concerns. Call us today to schedule your first appointment at (541) 389-3073. We look forward to meeting you and your child soon!

  • This is an awesome place!!!! Both my kiddos are on the autism spectrum and they handled all their sensory challenges and did a great job with both of them!!!

    Eric C. Bend, OR Resident
  • Everyone was very friendly and welcoming, I felt totally comfortable letting my toddler play in the waiting room without the presence of a disapproving eye that is too common in public places. The hygienist and dentist were both great, answered all my questions and were very encouraging and helpful. Looking forward to our next visit!

    Kalei T. Bend, OR Resident

Frequently Asked Questions

How should I clean my baby's teeth?

A toothbrush with soft bristles and a small head, especially one designed for infants, is the best choice for infants. Brushing at least twice a day, in the morning and at bedtime, will remove plaque bacteria that can lead to decay.

At what age should my child have his/her first dental visit?

The AAPD encourages parents and other care providers to help every child establish a dental home by 12 months of age. The AAPD recognizes a dental home should provide: comprehensive oral health care including acute care and preventative services in accordance with AAPD periodicity schedules.

What is baby bottle tooth decay and how can I prevent it?

Baby bottle tooth decay is a pattern of rapid decay associated with prolonged nursing. It happens when a child goes to sleep while breastfeeding and/or bottle feeding. During sleep, the flow of saliva is reduced and the natural self-cleansing action of the mouth is diminished. Avoid nursing a child to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bedtime bottle. Encourage your child to drink from a cup as they approach their first birthday. He or she should be weaned from the bottle at 12-14 months of age.

Can thumb sucking be harmful for my child’s teeth?

Thumb sucking and pacifier habits over a prolonged period of time can create crowded, crooked teeth or bite problems. If your child is still sucking on thumbs or fingers when the permanent teeth arrive, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your pediatric dentist. However, most children stop these habits on their own. “First visit by first birthday” is the general rule. To prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears, usually between 6 and 12 months of age, certainly no later than his/her first birthday.

What is baby bottle tooth decay and how can I prevent it?

Baby bottle tooth decay is a pattern of rapid decay associated with prolonged nursing. It happens when a child goes to sleep while breastfeeding and/or bottle feeding. During sleep, the flow of saliva is reduced and the natural self-cleansing action of the mouth is diminished. Avoid nursing a child to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bedtime bottle. Encourage your child to drink from a cup as they approach their first birthday. He or she should be weaned from the bottle at 12-14 months of age.

What about NURSING, BOTTLES & SIPPY CUPS

For babies & toddlers, liquids are one of the biggest concerns related to oral health. Here are four tips to help:

1. When nursing, be sure to clean baby teeth after each feeding—especially at night.
2. Never let your child go to bed with a bottle.
3. Don’t let your child walk around with or drink throughout the day from a bottle or sippy cup with anything except water in it. Milk & juice should be saved for meal times only.
4. Try to switch from a bottle to a sippy cup, and then to a regular cup, as soon as possible.

Meet the Doctors

Being a husband and wife dental practice is what makes us special! Dr. Steve and Dr. Stephanie are both graduates of Oregon Health Sciences University. Get to know our amazing doctors!

View Locations

New to Our Practice? Don’t worry, you can get all the inside scoop you need online. Take a quick tour of our Bend or Redmond office. Don’t hesitate to reach out if you’d like to schedule an in-office tour…

View Services

Life is full of curveballs, especially as a parent! To ease some of the unknowns, we try to stay ahead of the game with holistic preventative care designed to grow with your child…

How to Get Ahold of Us